climate change

Fertile Soil, Higher Profits with Conservation Agriculture

Even though she’s started improving her yields with conservation agriculture (CA), Specioza’s piece of land is too small to sustain her family, so she rents an additional plot. She says, “Even so, I still ended up with losses because the soil was exhausted, and our once-predictable climate has changed, making it hard to know what to plant when.”

Local partner PAG encouraged her to try a number of CA techniques aimed at replenishing the soil, like mulching and fertilizing with manure “tea” (liquid manure). During her training, she planted some climbing beans using traditional practices, and used CA on another plot, just to see the results from each.  She was astonished at the huge difference in quality and yield, and declares, “I will not stop practicing conservation agriculture now. After applying all this new knowledge both on my land and the rented land, the soil has started to regain its fertility and now I am making some profits.”

When one of her neighbors realized that the rented field had regained fertility and that Specioza was earning more profits, he thought he would take advantage of her hard work. He went to the land owner and tried to rent the plot at a higher price. Specioza was quite worried, but then gratified by the land owner’s generous reply:  “My land used to be worn out and exhausted, but now it has regained fertility because of Specioza. She is deserves to remain on it, since she takes such good care of it.”

Caption: Specioza’s climbing bean crop in a plot under conservation agriculture

Uganda Kabale Program
Led by World Renew with Local Partner PAG

05/29/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Another View: Changing climate hurts Honduran farmer

My name is Melecio Cantoral Gonzalez. I am 30 years old. I live with my parents, my wife and my two small children. We live in the community of Bella Vista, near Nueva Frontera in Honduras, in a small home made of adobe with a metal roof. It has a kitchen, a living room, and one small bedroom. My wife and I share our room with our children. Together with my family I farm a little more than 4 acres.

I walk about 30 minutes to get to the land I farm, which is on a steep slope. I grow mainly corn, red beans, and coffee. A couple of years earlier I started to plant other crops because of training I had received. I learned that I can’t support my family with just corn and beans and I learned other things, too,

02/24/2015 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

2014: The Fight Against Climate Change and Hunger Continue

The year in the humanitarian world? It ends with agencies scrambling to respond to another typhoon in the Philippines (luckily not as severe as last year's but still plenty worrisome), as well as bravely continuing work in the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis.

What 2014 has principally been, though, is a year of constant and churning problems, in which the challenges of climate change and food security (the availability and access to food) became more acute and ever-more clear.

12/11/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Innovating in the face of climate change

Using IV equipment from the local hospital, and a few plastic bottles, Pedro is adapting to the unpredictable challenges of climate change in Nicaragua. Read on! 

FRB's Nicaragua - Boaco Program works in paternship with World Renew to encourage farmers despite the increasing challenges of a changing climate. Read the origninal story, here, provided by World Renew! 

07/22/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Mozambique program brings conservation agriculture to 1,000 more farmers

Farmers in FRB’s Mozambique Tete-Mutarara program are experiencing increased yields through conservation agriculture. Despite frequent droughts and flooding, many are finding ways to improve planting techniques and soil condition.

06/27/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Central American coffee farmers vulnerable to climate change

A fungus called la roya, or coffee rust, is creeping throughout Central America, threatening livelihoods for millions of coffee farmers. FRB’s Central American programs are vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and the impact of la roya on the coffee industry. Farmer’s reliant on coffee production are challenged to reconsider a new path in life. To learn more, check out this article from the New York Times, “A Coffee Crop Withers.” Or, to make a difference, visit Equal Exchange, a fair trade organization that provides opportunities to support coffee farmers in Central America. 

06/18/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Ag development for small farmers heals the land in Nicaragua

Heydi, 32, a farmer in the disaster-prone area of Nicaragua along the Coco River (Río Coco) on the country’s eastern coast, now has the knowledge to provide food for her family thanks to training she receives at her local agricultural training center. FRB’s Río Coco program operates in the indigenous communities of this geographically isolated region which suffers from extreme rates of poverty, malnutrition, and vulnerability to climate change and natural disaster. After Hurricane Felix in 2007, local partner Acción Médica Cristiana created the center to offer communities appropriate agricultural practices to help them grow food in spite of the loss of trees and topsoil.

01/16/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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