food

Community Voices

“Having to leave the country to look for work is a huge cost, financially and in terms of the family and community, and people often return no better off than when they left. This program has made it possible for us to earn a living at home. Now we can say, ‘Here in Honduras there are riches.’ We didn’t go buy this food in the market. We produced it ourselves. That, to me, is being rich.” – Rafael

“We are grateful for [local partner] CASM because they work on a personal level in solidarity with families who have few resources. They encourage us to contribute our own efforts to carry out various community projects. They offer alternatives that are changing the way we live.” – Lilian  

“I’d never imagined that anything could be so effective for cooking as an eco-stove and also keep the smoke out of the house. It used to be impossible to control the smoke in the house with our traditional stoves. It damaged the roof and made the air unhealthy to breathe. The eco-stoves are energy efficient and economical – look at how few pieces of wood there are in there, but that’s all I’ll use all day to cook! Before, my husband was constantly carrying firewood for me. Now even he gets a rest.” – Lurbin

“I feel that we have achieved many changes in our community. Before, because we are so remote and it’s hard to get here, no government or international organizations ever came to offer us support. But this program has helped us so much. I feel really content and proud that I am improving my family’s nutrition and can even share all the products I have been able to grow. Greetings to all the donors who make this program possible, and thank you!” – Miguel Angel

Caption: Lurbin and her new eco-stove

Honduras Nueva Frontera
Led by Church World Service and Local Partner Comisión de Acción Social Menonita (CASM)
14 communities, 626 households, 3,130 individuals

04/09/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Forging Ahead Despite Challenges

Despite multiple challenges in post-conflict South Sudan, local staff has been hard at work training farm extension agents and health technicians to ready farmers and their families for better days. The civil war has ended, yet there continue to be security and infrastructure issues. The remoteness of the area means that people are not in direct danger from residual conflict, but also that basic services are lacking, including phone communications. Recent heavy rains brought flooding, and widespread illiteracy makes training much more difficult. Yet much has been accomplished.

The focus is particularly on women farmers – the backbones of the community. They need to get up to speed quickly on the most effective ways to manage their crops, vegetables, and homes.  Health extension workers have trained “hygiene promoters” to distribute supplies and show women how to treat both well water and river water. Families received soap and instruction on the importance of handwashing.

Agricultural extension workers also identified training needs and mobilized farmer groups to attend training sessions at demonstration plots.  They’ve taught basic principles of crop husbandry and growing vegetables. Because these farmers are starting out new, it has been necessary to distribute seeds and basic farming tools. Farmers are now concentrating on planting okra.

While challenges seem to be vast, it is clear that the will of local partner staff is strong. FRB’s implementing organization, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), is confident that the agriculture and health extension training is laying the groundwork for success for these people as they return to normalcy following the war. Your support and prayers are much needed and greatly appreciated.

Caption: Farmer groups during agricultural training

South Sudan Uror Program
Led by Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
1 community, 400 households, 2,800 individuals

 

03/13/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Tree Nurseries Provide Multiple Benefits to Farmers

Environmental conservation is an important focus of FRB’s Kenya Tigania program.  With training on better stewardship of water, soil, and forest resources coupled with conservation agriculture practices like mulching and crop diversification, farmers lessen the risk of crop failure due to drought in this dry region.

Two farmer groups recently completed training in planting and managing tree nurseries in their communities.  When their trees are large enough to transplant to members’ farms, they will strengthen the soil structure and provide material for mulching. Mulching and shade will conserve precious moisture during the growing season. Fruit trees will add to the diversity of the local diet, fodder trees will supplement the feed given to area livestock, mainly goats and dairy cattle. Other tree varieties will provide a renewable source of fuel and lumber.

After training, the groups received watering cans, machetes, hoes and seeds of a wide variety of trees. Six men and 35 women prepared the nursery beds, and are currently raising 10,000 seedlings for distribution to their members.

Photo caption: Women prepare soil for their tree nursery

Kenya Tigania Program
Led by World Renew and Local Partner ADS-Mt. Kenya East
7 communities, 200 households, 1,000 individuals

01/11/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Pancake Power!

A recent pancake breakfast by the Conrad IA Growing Project raised $1,600. The funds will be used to help pay for travel costs for 7 travelers to an upcoming trip to Guatemala. 

The group of 7 include students and adults from the local community. They will travel to Guatemala for about two weeks in March and visit several FRB projects there.

Interested in traveling with FRB? Check out our upcoming trips on the Travel page on our website.

02/15/2016 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Equality in West Africa

While all humans may be created equal, they certainly do not have equal opportunities and access to food, water, healthcare and income. Watch this series of short videos by World Renew on their West Africa 1 Program and see how your life might be different had you been born in West Africa.

04/29/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

A message from FRB's West Africa 1 Program

Thank you to World Renew and local partner, Showing Everyone Love, for their wonderful series of video's on the West Africa 1 program. In a very challenging context where security is a issue, this program is working to improve production of, access to, and use of food in 55 villages, through training on tree preservation and reforestation, improved cooking stoves, gardening and nutrition, the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) method for planting rice, micro credit funds, raising chickens and health and hygiene.

09/25/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Uganda, program farmers are well on their way to food security

One farmer’s story

Emmanuel, 47, is now closer to food security for his family thanks to context appropriate ag training and a loan of plant materials from the FRB-supported Uganda-Teso food security program. With the farming technologies he’s learned, he’s produced enough cassava and groundnuts to sell.

07/08/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

In Nicaragua, positive change really happens in program communities

“Do you see change taking place in your work?” People often ask me,  as Country Consultant of World Renew (WR) programming in Nicaragua, I recently joined an FRB/WR team that evaluated the Nicaragua-Farmer program in the households “have access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food during the entire year.” We saw evidence of much positive change among participants, for whom the program’s goal is to ensure that allcentral mountain region of the country.

06/05/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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