WHI

“Hunger Months” Are a Thing of the Past

As the successful Mozambique Garden program winds to a close, families have more food and better nutrition during “hunger months” – the period between when stored food is eaten and the next harvest. Community members testified how much the program has helped them survive – and flourish! – through the off season, and expressed their gratitude to all. 

After traditional crops of corn, beans, cassava and peanuts were harvested, no one used to plant anything during the cool, dry months of June, July and August because of lack of rain. People depended on their dwindling stores of grain, and often lost livestock during that period because they couldn’t feed or water them.

But with our support, families now plant and irrigate vegetable gardens on communal plots of land arranged around community wells. They use abundant cattle manure to enrich the sandy soil and increase the nutritive value of the vegetables they grow. Where they used to get by during the off season on one meal a day of a cassava or maize porridge called xima (pronounced “shima”), they can now count on having two or three meals a day during that time. Their cassava or grain stores last longer when they mix their xima with tasty cassava leaves, cabbage, tomato and onion, and their health and energy improves.

A final survey indicates that 85% of families now grow enough to sell some of their crops or produce for income. Almost 83% said they have been able to save money to buy seeds for the next crop season and purchase household staples and needed medicines.

An interesting observation is that, while all participants now fertilize their gardens with manure from the area’s cattle, 78% of them had never used it on their crops prior to receiving instruction. They all said they would continue to fertilize row crops and gardens with manure.

Photo caption: Lush gardens fertilized with the area's abundant manure

Mozambique Garden Program
Led by World Hope International
16 communities, 1,455 households, 8,730 individuals


01/31/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Update on Ebola in West Africa

Several countries in West African have been fighting an Ebola outbreak for the past several months and the disease continues to spread.  There are now 6 countries in the region where the disease has been found – Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal.  

One of the countries hardest hit is Sierra Leone where we have two FRB programs

09/19/2014 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Planting Pineapples, Harvesting Hope

Check out the video below by World Hope International!

FRB's Sierra Leone - West program works with smallholder farmers who live in the area of a former Internal Displaced Person's camp during the 1991-2002 civil war. Through the cultivation of pineapple, farmers are integrated into the supply chains of export-oriented processing companies.

11/15/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Culturally relevant agribusiness for smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone

The Sierra Leone-West program is a business-oriented poverty-reduction initiative of World Hope International (WHI) in conjunction with FRB. The program works with smallholder farmers in Sierra Leone to develop sustainable, culturally relevant agribusiness enterprises at the village level, such as growing and selling mangoes and pineapples to a local juice processor.

Communities in the program area are exceedingly vulnerable. Lack of employment among men and women of working age causes poverty. Lack of capital to cultivate food creates food insecurity.

08/02/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

SD couple spearhead effort to donate crops to countries in need

Newsletter: 

BRIDGEWATER, S.D. — In 2007, Kenton Hofer took a mission trip to Guatemala. While there, he helped build a house for an 82-year-old widow, who every afternoon would sit on a rock and shell corn, one ear at a time, so she could have supper.

Upon witnessing the woman’s poor living conditions and her hands, crippled from arthritis and poor health, the rural Bridgewater farmer knew he needed to do more than build a house.

05/28/2013 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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