expenses

Self-Sufficiency Success

Wilfredo is experiencing success! He is a farmer who is using a variety of agricultural methods designed to overcome the challenges of drought, hail, and the freezing temperatures of the Peruvian Andes.  He says, “I like the whole process of growing vegetables. There’s always enough for my daughters to eat. What I sell most is lettuce and sweet peppers, not only here locally but also in town.”

Farm families in the program’s eight communities are growing greater quantities and varieties of vegetables, with enough left over to sell and earn an income. They are also improving their overall health by focusing on water sanitation, home and personal hygiene, and learning to prepare delicious and nutritious meals. Encouragingly, the previous phase of the program saw a significant reduction in child malnutrition. Children are eating a wider selection of healthy food, and their bodies are able to process nutrients more efficiently because their parents’ water sanitation efforts resulted in a decrease in water-borne diseases and parasites.

Luz, who owns some cows, says, “I’m learning how to make yogurt!  My children like it a lot. I’m planning on getting more cows so I can make enough yogurt to sell.”

The aim of the program is for participants to become self-sufficient. Janet says, “We are happy because we receive information on expenses – what happens with the money CEDINCO gets from the program.  We know that it doesn’t cover everything we do here, and we agree that we need to do our part and put in some money on our own.”

Caption: A cooking demonstration covers foods that reverse anemia

Peru Castrovirreyna Program
Led by Lutheran World Relief and Local Partner CEDINCO

07/18/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More

Keeping Track of Expenses Leads to Profits

Dimnoré is finally getting ahead, thanks to putting into practice what she learned from the program about “SMART” marketing goals (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-based). It was only when she learned how to keep track of her small business expenses that she realized she’d doing a great deal of work for not much profit, and how to do better.

Dimnoré belongs to a Savings and Internal Lending group.  She took out a small loan to buy néré tree seeds to start making and selling soumbala (a fermented, protein-rich condiment, sold in balls or patties and used in a variety of dishes across Africa). Her original goal was at least to repay what she’d borrowed, plus interest. With her loan of $45 she grossed $54, and felt she’d gained, but when she learned how to subtract expenses, she was shocked that she’d netted only 95 cents. Or, as she put it, “I realized I was gaining nothing but suffering from all my work.”

Since then, she keeps track of all her costs, and is always finding ways cut down on cash outlays.  For instance, instead of spending money on public transportation and the day’s food to buy bags of seed at the city market, she asks a friend who is going anyway to get them for her. With her newfound earnings she’s been able to pay off her loan and has bought sheep to fatten for sale. She feels she’s becoming a SMART business woman, indeed!

Caption: Fattening sheep for resale

Burkina Faso Namentenga Program
Led by Catholic Relief Services

06/13/2018 | Comments: 0 | Add Comment | Read More
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